City of Boise Proposed Budget

We just received this post from Boise’s Energize program. Of course, residential property values have skyrocketed these past few years but the real drivers of your property tax bill are the spending/budgets of our taxing districts.

Your CTNA urges you to open or download the City of Boise’s “proposed” budget at – cityofboise.org/budget. It is both detailed and informative!

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MAYOR MCLEAN PRESENTS PROPOSED 2023 BUDGET

The proposed FY 2023 budget for the General Fund totals $306,028,033 including $15.2 million in federal recovery money and will be presented at the Boise City Council Budget Workshop on Tuesday, June 28 at 8 a.m.

“As always, we are focused on caring for the people of this city. This budget provides property tax relief for homeowners and directs resources to keep our city safe, make homes more affordable, grow our economy, take climate action, and ensure we care for our families while giving back to our unique and welcoming community,” said Mayor Lauren McLean. “Now more than ever, we must support all the people of Boise to ensure we’re truly a city for everyone.”

You can view highlights of the proposed FY 2023 budget as well as download the full budget book at cityofboise.org/budget.

The public is encouraged to participate by watching the budget workshop online. Details are available here: https://www.cityofboise.org/…/city-council-work-session-2/

Residents are also invited to give feedback at the Boise City Council budget public hearing on Tuesday, July 19 at 6:00 p.m. This meeting will be held at City Hall. Residents can opt to participate virtually by providing testimony via Zoom. Details are available here https://www.cityofboise.org/…/2022/july/city-council-1/

The city will also accept feedback in advance of the public hearing. This feedback will be shared with the mayor and Boise City Council. Feedback must be submitted by noon on Monday, July 18. You can submit your feedback at https://www.cityofboise.org/budget

Zoning Code Rewrite

CITY OF BOISE UPDATES PROPOSED ZONING CODE, SEEKS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK 

The City of Boise is actively working on creating a city for everyone. To make sure the future design and development of our city offers housing options for all who choose to call Boise home, the outdated zoning ordinance needs to be updated to ensure walkable, dynamic spaces throughout the city, and preserve the things we love most about our community.  

Resident input and collaboration are key to creating a city that serves current and future Boiseans. We are grateful to those who have participated in virtual and in-person events to provide feedback on early drafts of the proposed zoning code. In the winter months, community members across the city came together to share their recommendations. Based on what we heard, city staff made substantial changes. A full outreach summary report, including survey results, is available here.  

The city will release a new draft with updates on July 12, following a Boise City Council work session. The revisions made are based on resounding themes from the community, including: 

1.    Creating a city with a variety of great neighborhoods. 

2.    Directing development where there is planned public investment. 

3.    Developing a strategy to produce affordable and sustainable housing.  

4.       Targeting development to maintain parks and open space.  

“The feedback we have received from Boise residents has helped shape the updates the community will see in the new draft. We are shifting from a one-size-fits-all approach to one that recognizes the unique physical characteristics of Boise and promotes diverse neighborhoods. This is a rare opportunity to create development standards that help us achieve a city for everyone,” said Tim Keane, Planning and Development Services Director.  

The city will host three open houses to meet with residents and discuss the updates. Each open house will begin with a short presentation from city staff, followed by Q&A, and an opportunity to speak directly with staff on different aspects of the draft. Residents are encouraged to attend and can RSVP here.  

July 14 from 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. at Library! at Hillcrest 

July 18 from 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. at Main Library  

July 28 from 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. at Quail Hollow Golf Course Club House 

Gary Dufault
President
Centennial Neighborhood Association

http://centennialna.org/

The Road Ahead for the Centennial NA

A good example of purpose for CTNA: Eagle Road comes to mind. One could say “A River Runs Through It”. Our neighborhoods are bisected by one of the busiest corridors in Idaho. How can we make it become all that it can be?
There are many key stakeholders in our section of Hwy 55 as it courses from The City of Eagle south beyond I-84. Among these are the cities of Boise, Meridian and Eagle, Ada County Highway District, Idaho Transportation Department, major subdivisions, countless businesses, thousands of commuters and, of course, the members and constituency of the Centennial Neighborhood Association.
CTNA gives us an opportunity to build consensus and bring a potent voice to the table. This example is figuratively representative of our many prospective purposes.
We are asking you to become a contributor to our travels on the road ahead.
Informative links:

http://centennialna.org/

https://www.cityofboise.org/programs/energize/neighborhood-associations/

https://www.cityofboise.org/programs/energize/neighborhood-associations/centennial-neighborhood-association

What is a Neighborhood Association?

A Neighborhood Associations (NA) primary function is to work with the city towards the common goal of creating strong “vibrant” communities. This can include:

  • Creating Neighborhood Events
  • Building or Improving shared spaces
  • Learning about and informing neighbors of new plans and developments
  • Providing a voice for the future of our communities with the city
  • And so much more
    Without an NA the neighborhood would lose the ability to gain city grants and funding for events and projects as well as significant representation at city hearings.

Neighborhood Data Almanac

The Neighborhood Data Almanac provides data snapshots about residents, households, and the built and natural environments for the geographic boundaries of each of Boise’s registered neighborhood associations. All of the data provided in the almanac serve as a touch-point for any individual interested in better understanding the general composition of each neighborhood and, by extension, helps the city and residents better address the needs of each neighborhood.

Centennial Neighborhood Association

View the Almanac

Cottonwood Park New Playground

About the Park

Cottonwood Park is a small neighborhood 8-acre park located in west Boise. Amenities include a walking path, open play areas, playground and basketball courts.

New playground

The playground features include climbing walls and a finger maze to promote tactile based play, bells for auditory stimulation, binoculars for visual play and equipment designed to encourage children of all abilities to explore. Ten-foot swings and a Ten Spin inclusive motion spinner also promote social play at Cottonwood Park. In addition, a special bonded rubber fall material was installed underneath the playground – the surface is easy to navigate for people who use assistive mobility devices and provides a soft surface for all playground users.

City of Boise Celebrates New Accessible and Inclusive Playground at Cottonwood Park

KTVB-New playground for Boise’s Cottonwood Park is all-inclusive